British Involvement in Lithuania

Lituania - Times

lituanian officers

Carr in airforce cap, standing behind Crozier.

Crozier was Inspector General of the Lithuanian Army, and with him reports say that as well as a number of soldiers, 4 RAF men came too and were attached to the Lithuanian Air Force - there seem to be 5

Carr

MacFie

Saunders

Bowen

Pereira

In 1919 a German Junkers F13 low wing passenger monoplane on a secret flight from Germany to Russia came down in Lithuania and was confiscated. This caused a diplomatic row and German pilots and instructors were withdrawn from Lithuania. As a result four ex RAF pilots were hired of which Major Carr was one. At the time Lithuanian military aviation was divided into two parts

From Foreign Office files at Kew, the official policy towards Crozier and his team was that they were to be considered as officers of the Lithuanian Army and that they were private citizens. Hence Tallents could suggest, but certainly could not instruct Crozier. The two did, however, co-operate, at least initially and had some success in improving relations between the Lithuanians and Letts. Curzon certainly kept the FO informed during the setting up of his mission, but appears not to have communicated with them once he arrived in the country. On his return to UK he arranged for his diary of his time in Lithuania to be sent to the FO, but they lost it! This was in the hope of gaining FO employment. Croizer himaself saw his prime task in Lithuania, at least initially, as getting the Lithuanian Army in shape to counter the threat from von der Goltz. As for the Tallents mission, which became officially known as the Batlic Mission, it became discredited by the FO, mainly because of the behaviour of some of its members. Ward himself was accused by the Lithuanians of drunkenness and other debauchery, although no concrete evdence was found of this.

Other British officers in the area include

Parcell Rees Bowen